Monthly Archives: July 2011


'MOE’s First Crawfish Boil!' By Chef Shane Zimmerman

For the IFT Annual Conference, the MOE crew (Bunge’s Mobil Oil Experts food truck team) had a special treat for the attendees; a Traditional Crawfish Boil with all the fixin’s.  It was, by far, the highlight of show for all who came by the booth the two days it was held.  But to give a little background, a traditional Crawfish boil has its roots in the Cajun country of Louisiana, and was originally a poor people dish.  Crawfish were, and still are, relatively inexpensive compared to their cousins, lobsters and crabs.  Traditional ingredients include onions, new potatoes, ears of corn, garlic heads, Cajun sausages, and crawfish, but there are variations and different additions depending on the boil master.  Seasonings can include crab boil packets, cayenne, hot sauce, lemons, bay leafs, salt and pepper.  The MOE crawfish boil included fried Andouille sausage, small ears of corn, red potatoes, onions, Zatarin’s crab boil, Louisiana Hot Sauce, Bay leafs and of course live crawfish.   Here is an important tip for those who are new to the crawfish boil experience: the crawfish have to be boil alive, as those have expired release a toxin as their insides start to decompose.  It is much like mussels, clams and lobster, as they too need to be alive before cooking.  A true boil expert or connoisseur will tell you that the crawfish, dead or alive, can be boiled altogether.   The ones with limp tails should not be eaten, an indication that they were dead before they were boiled.  So only eat the ones with a curled tailed, and don’t forget the best part, sucking down the heads!