'Suzie Q’s Smoked Fish' by Chef Kyleigh Beach

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One of the cool perks about traveling for work is discovering new foods particular to that region, city, or state.  On one of my recent trips to Wisconsin I discovered some fantastic locally caught and smoked fish right in the regular grocery store.  I brought some home and liked it so much I bought a whole side to take home for Christmas, where it was a major hit.
Susie Q Fish Market is located in the town of Two Rivers right on Lake Michigan.  This family owned and operated company smokes everything from chubs to salmon to whitefish and runs a sustainable fishing operation.  Their fish is sold in grocery stores and featured on restaurant menus throughout Wisconsin and is some of the best smoked fish I’ve ever had – rich and meaty without being overly smoked or salty.    
Here’s a delicious and interesting recipe featuring the flavors of a smoked salmon bagel, but in a frittata:
 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
¼ cup minced red onion
¼ cup seeded and diced tomatoes
6 eggs, beaten
4 ounces smoked fish
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons freshly chopped herbs, such as dill, parsley, or chives
Thick country bread, toasted
Crème fraiche, for serving
Capers, rinsed and drained, for serving

  1.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. 
  3. Add the red onion and cook until softened, 3 or 4 minutes.  Add tomatoes and cook another minute.
  4. Pour the eggs into the skillet and stir gently with a rubber spatula until they begin to set.  Lift the cooked edges of the frittata with your spatula and tilt the skillet to allow the uncooked eggs to run underneath. 
  5. Once the bottom is set, mix in the flaked, smoked fish, salt, pepper, and chopped herbs.  Transfer the skillet to the oven and cook until set on top, 5 to 8 minutes.
  6. Remove the frittata from the oven and loosen from the skillet with the spatula.  Slide the frittata out onto a serving platter and cut into wedges.  Serve with toasted bread, crème fraiche, and capers.
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